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Convenience


Convenient locations, one-stop shopability, and right product variety make up the Convenience pillar. Convenience is the least important factor for explaining short-term market share gains, and retailers in each of the four Covid Momentum Quartiles performed similarly on Convenience.

customers favored Speed during Covid, which correlates negatively with larger format stores where customers can do all their shopping at once. Moreover, evolving commuting behaviors from people working from home and limited mobility due to stay-at-home orders shifted which stores were now considered Convenient. While people were adjusting to new ways of shopping for food, and making trade-offs on Price and product quality and variety, they were being hit with out-of-stocks, which affected their ability to easily buy their typical brands.

Despite stay-at-home orders, changes in commuting behaviors and erratic outof-stocks (or perhaps because of these things), basket sizes were up and visits per customer were down for every retailer we studied. At the time we surveyed, the average basket size was ~30% higher for shoppers in the market. Additionally, the average share of wallet that customers were giving to their current grocery retailer was ~14% higher. Translation: customers consolidated their shopping to fewer stores, giving more money to each store. This occurred even for stores that were competitively less well-positioned for one-stop-shopability heading into Covid. In fact, stores that scored in the lowest quartile on "I can do all my shopping at this one store" had the largest increases in basket size and share of wallet during Covid. In other words, during Covid, shoppers were more forgiving of a retailers' faults in their quest to fulfil their short-term shopping needs and get home quickly and safely.

Convenience and Covid: Voice of the customer

"With work at home - I cannot shop at the grocery stores I usually shop at because they are in the town where I work - 30 minutes away and feel wasteful driving that far just for groceries."

FOR BRANDS

In the first episode of Customer First Radio, Dave Clements, Global Head of Retail for dunnhumby and David Ciancio, Global Head of Grocery for dunnhumby kick off the series by discussing what it means to be a truly Customer First business, share which retailers and brands today embody a Customer First mindset, and examine how Customer First materialized during the pandemic with retailers.

black and silver headphones on black and silver microphone
Photo by Will Francis on Unsplash

The 2021 Retailer Preference Index: Who's winning and why. David Ciancio, Global Head of Grocery discusses the 2021 U.S Retailer Preference Index (RPI): Grocery Edition with the lead author of the RPI, Erich Kahner. They unveil key insights and discuss who is winning and who is best positioned for the future.

dunnhumby’s Prophets of Aisle Six, Episode 2: Heinen's Fine Foods

The Prophets of Aisle Six is the first online reality series focusing on innovation in the food retail industry. In this episode, Jose Gomes, dunnhumby's North America Managing Director, travels to the downtown Cleveland store of Heinen's Fine Foods. Jose meets with Tom and Jeff Heinen, co-owners and brothers, and learns how they are evolving their grandfather's mission of delivering excellent customer service. With 23 stores in Northeast Ohio and the greater Chicago area, and a 90-year legacy, Heinen's is proving that being a small retailer can be an advantage when it comes to data.

In this series, dunnhumby tours the globe and speaks with some of the world's greatest brands, exploring their biggest challenges and how they are using customer data science to meet those challenges.


In my last post, I posed five questions to retailers to help them determine whether they're ready for a customer-first mindset. Now, I'd like to challenge the retail basics that seasoned retailers were trained on, and suggest instead a new customer data science approach.

"Retail is detail" is common industry wisdom, and it means that achieving success is subtle and difficult. Success in any field demands practice and experience, and so it is little wonder that many senior retail and brand leaders and managers have vast years of involvement, and that most have grown up through the business in progressive steps.

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